Broad Lane, Nantwich, Cheshire, CW5 7QL

01270 906124

admin@stapeleybl.cheshire.sch.uk

A A A

Stapeley Broad Lane CofE Primary School

ICT/Computing

What is Computing?

Computing is the study and use of systems that handle information electronically. Computers are the most obvious of these but also include telephones, programmable robots, tape recorders, calculators, video cameras and mobile devices.

Aims and objectives

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems.

ICT is changing the lives of everyone. Through teaching ICT we equip children to participate in a rapidly changing world where work and leisure activities are increasingly transformed by technology. They will be taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

The aims of computing are to enable children:

  •  to understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
  •  to analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  •  to evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  •  to be responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

 

During Key Stage 1 pupils explore ICT and learn to use it confidently and with purpose to achieve specific outcomes. They start to use ICT to develop their ideas and record their creative work. They become familiar with hardware and software.

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Finding things out

1. Pupils should be taught how to:
a. gather information from a variety of sources [for example, people, books, databases, CD-ROMs, videos and TV]
b. enter and store information in a variety of forms [for example, storing information in a prepared database, saving work]
c. retrieve information that has been stored [for example, using a CD-ROM, loading saved work].

Developing ideas and making things happen

2. Pupils should be taught:
a. to use text, tables, images and sound to develop their ideas
b. how to select from and add to information they have retrieved for particular purposes
c. how to plan and give instructions to make things happen [for example, programming a floor turtle, placing instructions in the right order]
d. to try things out and explore what happens in real and imaginary situations [for example, trying out different colours on an image, using an adventure game or simulation].

Exchanging and sharing information

3. Pupils should be taught:
a. how to share their ideas by presenting information in a variety of forms [for example, text, images, tables, sounds]
b. to present their completed work effectively [for example, for public display].

Reviewing, modifying and evaluating work as it progresses

4. Pupils should be taught to:
a. review what they have done to help them develop their ideas
b. describe the effects of their actions
c. talk about what they might change in future work.

Breadth of study

5. During the key stage, pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through:
a. working with a range of information to investigate the different ways it can be presented [for example, information about the Sun presented as a poem, picture or sound pattern]
b. exploring a variety of ICT tools [for example, floor turtle, word processing software, adventure game]
c. talking about the uses of ICT inside and outside school.

 

 

During Key Stage 2 pupils use a wider range of ICT tools and information sources to support their work in other subjects. They develop their research skills and decide what information is appropriate for their work. They begin to question the plausibility and quality of information. They learn how to amend their work and present it in a way that suits its audience.

Knowledge, skills and understanding

Finding things out

1. Pupils should be taught:
a. to talk about what information they need and how they can find and use it [for example, searching the internet or a CD-ROM, using printed material, asking people]
b. how to prepare information for development using ICT, including selecting suitable sources, finding information, classifying it and checking it for accuracy [for example, finding information from books or newspapers, creating a class database, classifying by characteristics and purposes, checking the spelling of names is consistent]
c. to interpret information, to check it is relevant and reasonable and to think about what might happen if there were any errors or omissions.

Developing ideas and making things happen

2. Pupils should be taught:
a. how to develop and refine ideas by bringing together, organising and reorganising text, tables, images and sound as appropriate [for example, desktop publishing, multimedia presentations]
b. how to create, test, improve and refine sequences of instructions to make things happen and to monitor events and respond to them [for example, monitoring changes in temperature, detecting light levels and turning on a light]
c. to use simulations and explore models in order to answer 'What if ... ?' questions, to investigate and evaluate the effect of changing values and to identify patterns and relationships [for example, simulation software, spreadsheet models].

Exchanging and sharing information

3. Pupils should be taught:
a. how to share and exchange information in a variety of forms, including e-mail [for example, displays, posters, animations, musical compositions]
b. to be sensitive to the needs of the audience and think carefully about the content and quality when communicating information [for example, work for presentation to other pupils, writing for parents, publishing on the internet].

Reviewing, modifying and evaluating work as it progresses

4. Pupils should be taught to:
a. review what they and others have done to help them develop their ideas
b. describe and talk about the effectiveness of their work with ICT, comparing it with other methods and considering the effect it has on others [for example, the impact made by a desktop-published newsletter or poster]
c. talk about how they could improve future work.

Breadth of study

5. During the key stage, pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through:
a. working with a range of information to consider its characteristics and purposes [for example, collecting factual data from the internet and a class survey to compare the findings]
b. working with others to explore a variety of information sources and ICT tools [for example, searching the internet for information about a different part of the world, designing textile patterns using graphics software, using ICT tools to capture and change sounds]
c. investigating and comparing the uses of ICT inside and outside school.